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SRELTlNGSi 




CI)* College (Breetings 

The College Greetings is published monthly by the students 
of Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all deparments, and from the alumnae. They are due the 
fifteenth of each month. 

Subscriptions, $1.00 a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 

Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 

CONTENTS 

Victory 3 

As the Thermometer Went Up 4 

Sidelights on the Campaign 6 

A January Talk 8 

Ringling Sisters 9 

From the Freshman Theme Basket 12 
New Books That Have Been Added to Our Library 15 

Editorial 16 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 17 

The Seniors 17 

Illiwoco Notes 18 

Phi Nu 18 

Lambda Mu 19 

College of Music 19 

Art Notes 20 

Exchanges 20 

Locals 21 

The Gribb 22 

Alumnae 23 



Z3I)e College i&rcetlngs 



VICTORY! 



To the I. W. C. girl of to-day, as well as to the girls 
of yesterday and to-morrow, the successful endowment 
campaign means much. Her loyalty and enthusiasm 
were more deeply stirred as she watched the progress 
of the campaign and the "final day of triumph" to her 
seemed inevitable, because — well, it just had to be. It 
came and she is happy. 

The retention of rank as a standard college af- 
fected each student vitally. A diploma from a school 
that was not standardized would not carry much 
weight with strangers, whom one wanted to impress, 
or with beseiged school boards. Just think, then, how 
many valuable would-be teachers would have wearied 
away their days trying to find positions, if the last 
thousand dollars had not been given. Then, too, it 
would have been a terrible disgrace, if one, upon enter- 
ing another school either for under- or post-graduate 
work, had had to have been told: "Illinois Woman's 
College credits are no longer accepted here; you will 
have to take examinations. It was surely too bad about 
the endowment, for that college had been making a big 
name for herself." But there were enough faithful 
friends and everyone is happy. 

The girl of to-day loves to think of the wonderful 
future of the college — a future made gloriously near 
by the gift of endowment. She can vividly imagine a 
library growing as rapidly as a thirteen year old boy, 
extensive additions to equipment of laboratories, and 
bigger opportunities for the development of aesthetic 

Page Three 



13l)£ College Greetings 



taste. Scarcely further away in the future looms up 
the handsome new gym and its younger sister, a Stud- 
ent Building, for of course friends will be glad to give 
these to a college insured by such an endowment. 

To the girl of to-day, victory in this campaign 
means rejoicing for what the college has already given 
her, for what it is now prepared to give her, and for 
what it is to give the girl of to-morrow. She delights 
both in visions come true and in new ones to be made 
to come true. Helen McGhee, '16. 



AS THE THERMOMETER WENT UP 



About two weeks before the Chirstmas vacation 
there seemed to be a sudden burst of excitement 
throughout the halls, which first took definite form on 
Thursday morning when a mass meeting was held in 
Music Hall. The first few minutes of chapel time were 
taken up with a stunt, given by the girls who had been 
in school during the Endowment Campaign of 1913. 
An idea was given of how, at that time, all entered into 
the work and made a few pennies in every way possible. 
The scene was laid in two of the girls' room ; they were 
both busy rewriting themes for "endowment." One 
by one, girls came in asking to wash hair, waists, win- 
dows, manicure nails, black shoes, sweep and dust and 
do most everything else that could be thought of. Ev- 
eryone was busy for endowment. 

As soon as the stunt was ended, girls in the audi- 
ence were full of enthusiasm. One of the Juniors was 
first to speak. She told of the plan the class had in 

Page Four 



X5l)e College (Greetings 



mind, and which they were very willing to have copied. 
The plan was, to have a box in the office, into which 
everyone in the class could put a Christmas gift for the 
college ; as much as she could sacrifice from her allow- 
ance. This box then, was to be presented to Dr. Harker 
on Christmas morning. So the thirty minutes for 
chapel quickly fled, and to say the least, the time was 
much too short. 

By noon, the usual greeting "Hello" had changed 
to, "What are you going to do for endowment ?" In a 
day, the halls, bulletin boards and elevator had changed 
their natural appearance. Posters were hung every- 
where, advertising the different lines of work to be 
done for little money. The posters read, "Sleep late and 
be comfortable. I will close your windows and turn on 
the heat, at any time, for only 5 cents." "Let me darn 
your stockings." Art students offered their painted 
china and sketches at low prices, one Senior even of- 
fered to sell her senior privileges. 

During this time, Dr. Harker was away, but every 
day a telegram came instructing us to raise the Endow- 
ment thermometer a little ! When Dr. Harker returned, 
the day before the vacation, he wore a significant smile. 
No cuts were taken from that morning chapel; there 
was a feeling that some disclosure would be made. We 
were not kept waiting long. One by one our class presi- 
dents were called to the front and allowed to raise the 
indicator on the thermometer. Joyous and breathless, 
we watched the red mercury record the thousands and 
pause finally, past the half-way mark, at $52,000 ! 

Then we left for home. We shall never forget the 
two weeks of wondering, with only rumors to ease us. 

Page Five 



13l)£ College (Brectings 



Finally, however, some were appraised of the successful 
close of the campaign through the article in the Chicago 
papers, while others were left in suspense until the next 
day, when the letter came, telling the good news of vic- 
tory. Of course it is needless to say that we were over- 
joyed. 

It was a glad returning to College and still happier 
were we when we found all the songs composed and 
printed for a celebration in Chapel. The town-girls had 
been busy since the close of the campaign. Then dur- 
ing chapel we were happily surprised by the announce- 
ment of a half holiday. Johanna Onken, '17. 

$ 
SIDELIGHTS ON THE CAMPAIGN 



On Dec. 26th Bishop McDowell spoke at the Grace 
church in appreciation of the Woman's College. He 
complimented the members of the community upon 
having such a school and said they were very fortunate 
in having had Dr. Harker here as a force in the com- 
munity for so many years. He reminded us that our 
school, as a college, is young yet, but now it will grow 
even more rapidly than it has in the last few years. 

The whole United States aided and took an interest 
in our campaign. Maine, New York, New Hampshire, 
Pennsylvania, Alabama, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Michi- 
gan, California, and many others sent contributions — 
gifts came from north, east, south and west. Illinois, 
too, proved herself proud of her Woman's College. 

In round numbers there were six hundred subscrib- 
ers in this last campaign. Just think of it! The gifts 
ranged from one and two dollars up to thousands. Many 

Page Six 



Z3l)e College (BrcteUncjs 



subscriptions came in through the influence of the Ad- 
vocates,, which published far and wide the need of the 
College in hearty expressions of commendation. 

In its annual meeting, the Church Board of Edu- 
cation passed a resolution, especially urging the wor- 
thiness of the campaign and declaring our college to 
be of such importance outside of the State as well as 
in Illinois, that all Methodism should respond to its 
appeal. This resolution is the second of its kind ever 
made for any college by the board and it had undeni- 
able influence. 

No one was more enthusiastic than the town girls 
and on the eve of the 2nd the following scene occurred 
out on College Avenue : 

M. L. T. — Say, girls, let's fix up some songs for 
Tuesday. 

M. T. — I think that's a good idea. What shall we 
talk about? 

L. C. — Endowment, of course, and victory. 

H. H. — Let's put in something about Dr. Harker. 
He's worked the hardest for it. 

M. L. T.— That tune, "On, Wisconsin!" has lots of 
pep to it. Let's see how it goes. (Plays it over.) 

L. C— Use that. Now, what shall we say? 

M. L. T.— How's this? "On old college; dear old 
college." 

M. T. — That will do. Now your 'victory/ 

M. L. T.— "Victory now is ours !" Well ? 

H. H. — Don't forget Dr. Harker. Let's name Dr. 
Hancher, too. 

0. H. — We mustn't forget the "gym." 

Page Seven 



T5\)t College Greetings 



M. L. T. — We'll put that in another one. 

S. M. — Let's put in something about our College 
motto. This is a College Song ! 

M. T. — Let's get to work. I must go to League. 
(Two songs finished.) 

M. L. T. — Stop after church and we'll write some 
more. Everybody keep your wits working till then. 
(And you know the rest.) Opal Houck, '18. 

A JANUARY TALK 

The first of Miss Motherhead's talks, after vaca- 
tion was very appropriate and fitting, especially to 
those who were inclined to be homesick. She began 
by saying that the words, 

"No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease, 
No comfortable feel in any member — 

No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees, 
No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds, 
November !" 
apply not so much to that month as to January 
and February, in the average college. It seems 
that a sort of lethargy settles over students at 
this time of the year, giving them the blues and a gen- 
eral down-hearted feeling. 

She advised that we keep our bodies healthful by 
taking daily walks, and by proper foods. If the physi- 
cal condition is poor, it is doubly hard to keep the mind 
and heart cheerful. She suggested that we keep some- 
thing bright, as a potted plant in our rooms to aid in 
developing a happy atmosphere. 

She also warned us not to worry but to keep doing 
day by day. The whole talk was a challenge for a 
higher self control and gave us a zest to lift the blue 
cloud from January and February 1916. 

Ruth Grantham, '19. 

Page Eight 



X5l)e College <Brcetlngs 



RINGLING SISTERS 



It isn't every community that can have a circus in 
mid-winter — and brought to it's very door at that. 
But I. W. C. doesn't consider itself an ordinary every- 
day community. It was quite as a matter of course, 
we wish it understood, and entirely without arrogance, 
that we sent a summons in zero weather to "Ringling 
Sisters," ordering them to bundle up their animals and 
come on along. One might suppose that the housing 
question would have proven a difficulty. But not at all. 
I. W. C. is noted for its hospitality and democracy, and 
the flea was simply sent to room with the ringmaster, 
the donkey with the clown, and the bears with the 
leader of the band. 

But it is not only in the matter of fellowship that 
we are the van-guard in our era. In the realm of art, 
we are Futurists. (Cubists also, hence the unanimous 
approval of Ruth Mendenhall as clown). And what 
could have been a more satisfactory exponent of our 
new art than the "Ringling Sisters" band ? Such har- 
mony, such resonance of tone and above all— such var- 
iety ! Rarely has it been our privilege to hear so musi- 
cal a hat tree (or to see so expert a performer upon it 
as Miss Mildred Scott). Is it not the very essence of 
modernism to extract beauty from the most sordid 
materials? Fritz Kreissler himself could not have 
wafted us any higher in the directions of the welkin 
than did Miss Catherine Madden, with her "violin de la 
clothes basket, "or Miss Kitty Bunting with her "cello 
de la washboiler." The brilliant performance of Miss 
Marie Towle upon the stovepipe, a recent importation, 
resulted in an actual embodiment of musical essence. 

Page Nine 



'Gfye College Greetings 



At the culmination of a series of intricate measures, a 
sausage, that symbol of ideality, made its appearance 
at the mouth of the instrument. 

A word must also be said for the exquisite handl- 
ing of the "hose aix la funnel" by Miss Margaret Coul- 
tas and of the "Racquet Tennis" by Miss Mary Fowler, 
both recently of the Metropolitan Company. In places 
their interpretation was so artistic as to be considered 
by some undeniably artesian. 

The new Italian conductor, Signior Goldsmith Mar- 
garici, held the audience enthralled by the magnetism 
of her features, the superbness of her bearing and the 
hauteur of her moustache. 

Louise Reed was rarely beautiful in her part as 
Terpsichore. We especially admired the nonchalanse of 
her make-up. Her teeth had an easy carelessness of ar- 
rangement, assumed successfully only by the true es- 
thetic. 

Mabel Farieferro, on her majestic bay, pranced 
across the stage in a manner almost suggestive of the 
famous equestrian artist, Olive Scott. She was a fairy, 
a butterfly, (and though we scorn eulogy) a puffball! 
Her foot on the tight rope met with almost equal ap- 
proval. For, as she crossed the perilous chasm, the 
sanguinary audience hoped for a moment her "feet" 
would be no longer on the tight rope. 

Nor was the thrill lessened by the spectacular ap- 
pearance of Madame McCloud, the world renowned 
cyclist, who looped the loop and threatened the foot- 
lights in a manner upsetting to the neurosthenic mem- 
bers of the audience. 

Page Ten 



Z3l)e (College (Steeling* 



The minstrels, comprised of the celebrated sex- 
tette, the Misses Sconce, Woods and Gist and Messrs. 
Harrison, Wilkinson and Long, made a homely appeal 
by singing the American National hymns : "Great Big 
Silvery Moon" and "I've got a Castle on the River Nile." 
They also contributed local color by exchanging a few 
pleasantries about the faculty. 

Though we fail to see the inherent connection be- 
tween "Ringling Sisters" and the Athletic Association, 
we understand that there exists some base compact by 
which the latter organization is to receive not only the 
credit for but the proceeds from the entire perform- 
ance. And certainly the appearance (tho not exactly 
voluntary) of Miss Robinson at the last curtain call, 
seemed to give credence to this report. 

The caste of characters follows : 

Manager — Mabel Osborne. 

Ring Master — Jessie Wall. 

Clowns — Miriam Anderson, Louise Reed, Helen De- 
Witt, Ruth Mendenhall, Florence McCloud. 

Minstrels — Phyllis Wilkinson, Francis Sconce, 
Katherine Long, Ellen Woods, Mary Harrison, Anna 
Margaret Gist. 

Band — Conductor, Margaret Goldsmith; Pianist, 
Edith Brown ; Bass Viol, Catherine Madden ; Cello, Kit- 
tie Bunting ; French Horn, Margaret Coultas ; Trumpet, 
Marie Towle ; 1st Violin, Edna Robb ; 2nd Violin, Mary 
Fowler; Harp, Mabel Osborne; Trombone, Mildred 
Scott. 

Tight Rope Walker and Equestrian — Olive Scott. 

Animals — Bears, Muriel Thompson, Zay Wright; 
Mule, Front, Rowena Rogers, Back, Irene Cunningham ; 
Trained Flea, Olive Scott. 

Page Eleven 



13^e College ©reelings 



From the Freshman Theme Basket 

"I Can Easier Teach Twenty— " 



A very noticeable fact occurs every day in our nat- 
ural conversation. We very often are guilty of using 
words which we know are not in good form. Daily are 
we reminded of the errors but, try as we may, to im- 
prove, the words do pop out. So it did with Mary, when 
one day she was trying to improve the family in gen- 
eral. 

"Mother", she said, "have you ever noticed that 
not a single one in our family ever says 'yes 9 ? Papa 
says 'Yah', Florence says 'U-huh' and Bobby says 'Yip' 
—You just notice to-night!" 

Just then Bobby bounced into the room, his cheeks 
red from exercise. When asked if he'd had a good time, 
he answered the usual "Yip, Sis, you just oughta been 
there." 

Florence, in the other room, was heard to say, 
"U-huh, that is nice." 

When Mr. Black returned from his office his wife 
noticed the tired look. When he was asked if it had 
been a heavy day and he said "Yah, but then — " 

Mrs. Black then turned to Mary with an odd smile 
and said, "Yes, Mary, what you said this afternoon 
seems to be true enough and I think it's time we re- 
formed, don't you ?" 

Mary looked up and said, "Yep— I do." 

— Grace Hasenstab. 

Page Twelve 



T5t)e (College (Greetings 



The Kind of a Teacher A Freshman Likes 



The average student likes, first of all, a teacher 
who is human. Of course there are some unnatural 
wretches who think that if a teacher appreciates an 
enormous knowledge of the subject,, and rewards un- 
tiring and health-destroying study with high grades, 
he is a good teacher. However this is seldom the case. 
A teacher in a college should exact sufficient work to 
command the self respect of his students ; but by this 
I do not mean an unreasonable amount. He himself, 
should be reserved, not childish, well-prepared, not a 
"bluffer," charitable about work which must be made 
up, not an ogre, and above all things should have a 
sympathy and a personality which will win the confi- 
dence of the class. The ideal teacher excels in all of 
these points. The instructor who is reasonable about 
the work, and enters with an understanding into the 
social activities of college life, is bound to be well liked. 

Joye Webb. 

The Kind of A Senior A Freshman Likes 



How often Freshman are heard to say "Just be- 
cause she's a Senior, she wants to show her authority," 
and how disagreeable it is to have such Seniors about 
us. 

The Senior that a strange little Freshie likes is one 
who tells her things that every Freshman must learn in 
order to preserve her grace, in a simple, big-sisterly 
fashion. A Senior who is not too wrapped up in her 
own important affairs to run in to see the Freshman 

Page Thirteen 



Z3i}£ College (Greetings 



occasionaly or at least to smile at her, is the one who 
wins the love of a new girl. 

A few days ago, a Freshman said, "Oh, if I could 
be like that Senior, I would be happy. I always feel so 
comfortable in her company for she thinks of others 
more than of herself. I have never seen her without 
her encouraging smile and how I love her for it, for it 
always makes me want to do my best, and try to be as 
happy as she is, in doing it." — Mabel Weis. 

NEW BOOKS THAT HAVE BEEN ADDED TO OUR 
LIBRARY 



Rand— -The Classical Moralists. 

Moffatt — Introduction to the Literature of the New 
Testament. 

Cope— Efficiency in the Sunday School. 

Rauscenbusch — For God and the People. 

Coe — The Religion of a Mature Mind. 

Coe — Education in Religion and Morals. 

Inglis— The Bible Text Cyclopedia. 

Pratt — Psychology of Religious Belief. 

Case — The Evolution of Early Christianity. 

Halborn — The Need for Art in Life. 

James — The Varieties of Religious Experience. 

Margaret Anderson — The Study of Modern Painting. 

Brownell — French Art. 

Maspero — Egyptian Art. 

Moore — Character of Renaissance Architecture. 

Moore — The Mediaeval Church Architecture of Eng- 
land. 

Translated by Taylor— Greek and Roman Sculpture. 

Page Fourteen 



T5l)C College (Greetings 



Fromentin — The Masters of Past Time. 
Watson — Vol. X. Library of Home Economics. 
Thompson — The History of the Dwelling House and Its 

Future. 
Bryce — Modern Theories of Diet. 

Allen — Fourth Edition, Commercial Organic Analysis. 
Vulte and Vanderbilt — Food Industries. 
Edith Abbott — Women in Industry. 
Bailey — Source Chemistry and Use of Food Products. 
O'Shea — Dynamic Factors in Education. 
Faurce — The Educational Ideal of the Ministry. 
De Garmo — Principles of Secondary Education. 
Jones — Principles of Education. 
Sachs — The American Secondary School. 
Mitchell — Bergson's Creative Evolution. 
Roberts — Famous Chemists. 
Long, Leaf, Myers— The Iliad of Homer. 
Hall— Good Form for all Occasions. 
Roberts— The Cyclopedia of Social Usage. 
Cooley's — Human Nature and the Social Order. 
Cooley's— Social Organization. 



Do You Know Her Room-Mate? 

I. K. — Where are you going to sleep when your 
room-mate has company? 

R. G. — With Marie Limerick. 

I. K. — Why, hasn't she a room-mate ? 

R. G. — Oh, yes — but that's a small matter. 



Page Fifteen 



Clje College Greetings 

Vol. XX. Jacksonville, 111., February, 1916. No. 5. 

Faculty Adviser — Miss Jennie Anderson. 

Editor-in-chief— Ruth Want. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Alma Harmel. 

Assistant Editors— Norma Perbix, Margaret Slatten. 

Art Editor — Ruth Patton, 

Business Manager — Ruth Taylor. 

Assistant Business Managers — Phyllis Wilkinson, Ila Allen. 



Editorial 

ENDOWMENT 



The endowment is gloriously won, the examina- 
tions are over, for better or for worse, the grippe has 
loosened its hold a little, and we face a new semester. 
With the opening of February we close a period stren- 
uous yet withal victorious. A new era presents itself. 
Spurred by the impetus of the victories just completed, 
enlightened by some of the failures, we turn our faces 
toward this last stretch of the road with no hesitation. 
There is something remarkably exhilarating in the vic- 
torious attitude that makes real difficulties shrink and 
mock troubles melt away. This is the time for the 
bracing of muscles, for the lifting of sails, for the mak- 
ing of preparations with stout courage and high hearts 
"to brave another cruise." 

Page Sixteen 



Z3l)e College ©reelings 



The short-story contest which was to have closed 
last month is to be continued until the spring. This 
change has been made to accommodate possible contest- 
ants. Do not forget about it however, even if the final 
date is still a little way off. If you have not already 
commenced your story, start it now. Put your intent 
into action, and let us have your best results. 

Y. W. C. A. NOTES 



The month of February is to be the great jubilee 
month that we have heard so much about all year. As- 
sociations all over the United States are making great 
plans for the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the 
Y. W. C. A. 

Helen DeWitt visited the Millikin association Jan- 
uary tenth and eleventh. She is the annual member 
and represents the Y. W. C. A/s of Illinois College, Mil- 
likin, Knox as well as I. W. C. 

The first Sunday of the New Year was started off 
with a good attendance, a good leader and a good sub- 
ject. Come next Sunday and help maintain the stand- 
ard for the year. 

We have just received a box of fresh Brewster's 
chocolate. You can get it any time in the Y. W. C. A. 
room on 3rd floor Harker. 

THE SENIORS 



The class adviser, Miss Anderson, entertained the 
Seniors delightfully at a tea in her room shortly before 
the holidays. 

Page Seventeen 



T5i)& College (Breedings 



The gist of several Senior class meetings might be 
summed up in the following words : 

Oh, Senior, pretty Senior, 

Please wear your cap and gown ; 

For the honor of the College, 

And to bring yourself renown. 
The Seniors account for their lack of other activi- 
ties by the fact that they have just triumphantly com- 
pleted the last final examinations which will be granted 
them during their college career. 

$ 

ILLIWOCO NOTES 



The Illiwoco board feels safe in saying the annual 
will be out early this year. The final shipment was 
made to the engraver January twenty-fourth. The 
written material is due now and if it comes in promptly 
the printer can have the dummy, by the first of March. 

We hope to see you go home Easter with your new 
Illiwoco under your arm as well as your new bonnet on 
your head. 

PHI NU. 



During the holidays we were glad to add to our hall 
a new print of Millet's "Angelus." 

Announcements have been received of the mar- 
riage of Madeline Land, a last year's member, to 
Charles Philip Burnett, on the third day of January. 
They will make their home in Eldorado, Illinois. Word 
was also received this past week of the marriage of 
Vera Kennedy to Kenneth Keplinger. 

Page Eighteen 



T5\)<t (ToUcge (Brewings 



LAMBDA MU. 



Our society song contest has been an interesting 
feature of our programs, and we now have several new 
songs. 

We are glad to have Bess Seward with us again 
and to have Lela Geyer in the building. 

Ola Wendel and Pauline Hermann are both re- 
covering, and we are expecting them back again soon. 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



The past week has been an exceedingly busy one 
in the College of Music. Plans for the second semes- 
ter's work are rapidly taking shape, and several new 
courses of interest are to be offered. Several former 
students in the department have written recently, sig- 
nifying their intentions of continuing their study dur- 
ing next semester. 

Miss Winifred Sale officiated as organist at the 
First Methodist Church in Watseka during her vaca- 
tion, in the absence of the organist. Miss Sale's work 
won hearty praise by those who were fortunate enough 
to hear it. 

The work of the catalogue revision is going for- 
ward. The new catalogues will soon appear with sever- 
al new courses in the College of Music outlined. 

Mr. Stearns' next organ recital will be on the 6th 
of February and will be in the nature of a patriotic 
celebration, in view of the birthdays of Lincoln and 
Washington. The program will consist entirely of 

Page Nineteen 



T3lje College (Breetings 



compositions by American composers and will close 
with the Dudley Buck Sonata in E Flat, the finale of 
which is a fugue on "Hail Columbia." 

ART NOTES 



Illiwoco— the topic of the Studio! No one can 
come near the studio without catching the fever, for 
those who aren't making cartoons are posing for them. 

During the holidays a number of new books in art 
subjects were added to the art department of the lib- 
rary. 

The Friday Sketch Class has become such a pop- 
ular class that pictures had to be taken of it. Several 
very good pictures were taken by Mr. Vail showing the 
girls working, with Florence Cranston as the model. 
Mr. Vail will also take a picture of the regular classes 
at work in the Studio. Other girls, who have posed 
lately are Katherine Long and Gertrude Wilson. A 
number of attractive two hour poses have been ar- 
ranged for during the next few weeks. 

$ 
EXCHANGES 



The Western Oxford is especially well arranged 
and its various departments are very strong. The 
story in the December issue "It is More Blessed to Give 
than to Receive," to which the author gives the addi- 
tional title, "It is More Blessed to Give than to Keep" 
is very well written. 

Throughout the exchanges we find stories dealing 

Page Twenty 



^^e College (Greeting* 



with the present day war. One of these that is excep- 
tionally good is "Christmas Chords," in the Christmas 
number of the Illinois Wesleyan Argus. 

The November issue of the Kodak of Milwaukee- 
Downer College contains a very interesting account of 
its Class Day exercises entitled, "Mobilization of the 
Class of 1915." 

The Mary Baldwin Miscellany for December is 
indeed an excellent number. Not only does it contain 
entertaining stories but poetry, which many other ex- 
changes lack. The poem, "Your Road," is worthy of 
mention. 

LOCALS. 



On Thursday evening, January 13, the College mar- 
velled at the magic power of Senor del Casorino and his 
company. The company was made up of members of 
the 3rd prep class. 

Some of our faculty had very extensive trips dur- 
ing the Christmas vacation. Miss Gleckler was in New 
York ; Miss Leicht, in Florida ; Miss Walker, in Boston ; 
Miss Alexander and her mother were in Michigan, and 
Miss Benson, in Wisconsin. 

None of the late-comers after the holidays was 
welcomed with more warmth than Miss Miner, who 
has again taken up her duties in the infirmary. Miss 
Munze of Springfield has been assisting her since the 
middle of January. 

Soon after vacation, Dr. Harker left for Port Ar- 
thur, Texas, where he attended meetings in the interest 

Page Twenty-One 



T5\)t College Greetings 



of the Methodist college there. Shortly afterwards he 
attended meetings of the Board of Education at Chi- 
cago. 

We had quite an opportunity January 10, when 
David Bisphom and his company appeared at the Grand 
Theatre in "Adelaide 9 ' and "The Rehearsal." 



THE GRIBB 

(To be read with the popular nasal infection) 



For far ud wide the coundry o'er 
Has swept the debond gribb, 
Ud eadg one haz a duose thad's sore 
Or blizders on hiz libb. 

Yea, eben indo our owd bidst 
Has cumb this awful gribb, 
Oudside closed door you dare not lidst 
Of germs they are dnot ridd. 

The vikdoms they do wail ud boan, 
Ud ache from hedd du do; 
The dnurse quick for the doctor phodes, 
To fight the awful foe. 

The doctor kumbs ud gibbs them pills, 
Ud they do bedd bust go; 
Ud though he charges awful bills, 
They still are all laid low. 

Bendie (Alias Mendie.) 

M. H.— Oh! I feel so bad. Say, Ruth, what's a 
counter-pane ? 

Page Twenty-two 



"Clje College <&reetltt<js 



^•1<£- 




umnae 



Miss Myrtle Walker of Joplin, Mo., is now in Col- 
umbus, Ohio, doing special study in organ music. 

Miss Mary Crum of Pontiac, 111., is spending the 
winter in California. 

Word has been received of the approaching mar- 
riage of Miss Mary Ebert of Pontiac, 111., and Mr. James 
Scouller. Mr. Scouller has been engaged in educational 
work in the Philippines and on the fifth of February 
will sail again with his bride to Manilla. 

Miss May Hefflin of Winona, 111., has recently 
moved to Albuquerque, Arizona. 

We have been very glad to have Miss Kate Black- 
burn with us for the past several days. Her chapel 
talks have been most interesting, and the incidents 
from personal experience as told to the various classes 
have been very instructive. 

A daughter, Betty Jane, was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Wallace Mehl of Goshen, Ind., on November 17, 1915. 
Mrs. Mehl was Maude Alice Drake while attending I. 
W. C. 

On January 1, 1916, occurred the marriage of Miss 
Alma B. Weber and Mr. Bert K. Fairchild at Tower Hill, 
111. Leaving Pana the evening of the 1st, Mr. and Mrs. 
B. K. Fairchild went to Omaha, Neb., where they spent 



Page Twenty-three 



'D^e College (Breetings 



their honeymoon. From there they went to Ida Grove, 
Iowa, where they will make their home. 

Another wedding of great interest is that of Ber- 
tha Weber to Mr. Donald H. Fairchild. Mr. Fairchild 
has been interested in geological work and recently has 
been situated in Hayden, Arizona. In December, Miss 
Weber went to Denver, was met there by her fiance and 
married at her sister's home. We hear they travelled 
into Mexico but safely escaped with their lives, and are 
now settled in Hayden, Arizona. 

Do you suppose this is why they give us tests? 

Recent Gems from a Bible exam : 

In 160 B. C. the Christian Church was using the 
psalms. 

Hammurabi's tribe is one of the earliest in the He- 
brew history. 

The history of the Hebrews is oriental in many 
ways. 

Heard in Bible I 

M. K. — What do you suppose the people did with 
the twelve baskets of fragments picked up after the 
feeding of the five thousand ? 

F. M. — Why, I don't know, unless they made bread 
pudding of them. 

And Mary says she's Irish ! 

M. H., in conversation with a friend, pointed her 
finger at the latter by way of emphasis. The friend — 
"Don't point that at me ; it has a nail on the end of it." 

Later she found opportunity to repeat the remark 
to her roommate, saying triumphantly — "Don't point 
that at me ; it has a tack on the end of it." 

Page Twenty-four 



Jacksonville Candy Company 

We have just installed our New Soda Fountain, and we 
can serve everything in the confectionery line < Hot or Cold 
— Also wemake all kinds of Homemade Candies and guarantee 
them under the pure food law. 

We have the very best electric Piano at our store. 
57 E. SIDE SQUARE B. J. GEANETOS, Prop. 

BOTH PHONES 566 



The Home of Good Things to Eat 

Walker's 
Grocery 

Homemade 

BREAD, CAKES, COOKIES 

SALAD DRESSING, Etc. 



205 East Morgan 



Both Phones 



W. E. Boston 

DEALER IN GROCERIES AND 
MEAT 



600 EAST COLLEGE AVENUE 
Both Phones 100 



FLORETH & COMPANY 

LEADERS IN EVERYTHING NEW IN MILLINERY 
COATS FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILREN 
DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES FOR CASH 



Ideal Bread 

is Better; 
so are the cakes 



DORWART'S CASH 
MARKET 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH AND 

SALT MEATS, FISH, POULTRY 

ETC. Both Phones 196 

230 WEST STATE STREET 



=^ 



STYLISH APPAREL FOR YOUNG 

WOMEN 

SUITS, DRESSES, MILLINERY 
CLOAKS, WAISTS, LINGERIE 

In addition to the Newest Models in Ready=to=wear Garments 
from the Best Makers — we are showing the Correct Styles 
in CORSETS,— the Newest HOSIERY, Street and Evening 
Gloves, Dainty Neckwear, Handkerchiefs, Ribbons, Toilet 
Articles, Art Goods. 

F. J. WADDELL & COMPANY 

Miss C. — Miss L. translate: Please bring me a 
ham sandwich. 

Miss L. — "Bitte, geben Sie mir ein-ein-"-I don't 
know where to put the ham. 

Miss C. — I should put it between the bread, but you 
are doing very well. Go on. 

PHELPS & OSBORNE 

IS THE COLLEGE GIRL'S 
STORE 
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS, RIBBONS, LACES, AND NOTIONS 

POPULAR PRICES ALWAYS 

FASHIONABLE DRESS MAKING 
AND TAILORING 

A FULL LINE OF DRESS TRIMMINGS 
MRS. EMMA CORRINGTON 

ILLINOIS PHONE 547 241 WEBSTER AVE. 



OUR PICTURES 

ARE NUNC IN THE BEST HOMES IIS THE CITY 
AND COUNTY 



Mollenbrok & McCullough Studio 

WEST STATE ST. 



THE 



Big City Market 

All Kinds of Fancy 
Fruit 

CANNON BROS. 

W.StateSt. III. Phone 1288 

WE DELIVER 



SEE 

BONANSINGA 



FOR 



Fancy Fruits 

Confectionery 

72 East Side Square 



Ques. — How many fords are there in Palestine? 
Ans. — I don't know, but there were estimated to 
be 200,000 Fords in the U. S. last year. 



KODAK FINISHING 

This is our SPECIALTY— You Want the BEST Results— 
Our Workmanship and Materials Give Them 

VAIL..& VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 East Side Square 



r ^ 



Secretary Photographer's Association of Illinois. 

Awarded Silver Medal for Home Photographer at Illinois State 
Convention, 1914 

OTTO SPEITH 

PORTRAITURE BY PHOTOGRAPHY 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



Was she reflecting on the rendition of the numbers? 

M. 0. (Reading minutes of preceding meeting) — 
And the following program was — executed ! 



ROBERT H. REID 

"Photographs That Please" 

Member Photographer's Association of America 
HOCKENHULL BUILDING 



: ^ 



Want 

Cut flowers 



FROM 






JOSEPH HEINL&SONS 

BOTH PHONES WEST STATE STREET 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE 

Harold J. Johnson, Mgr. 



High Class- Vaudeville & Pictures 

4-Piece Orchestra Afternoon 

and Evening 

A BIG Special Feature Every Monday 

PRICES 5 and 10c 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 



ALWAYS THE 
LATEST AND 
BEST IN 
MOTION 
PICTURES 



GIRLS— PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS. 



HARRY HOFMANN FLORAL CO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers 

Plants 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



Greenhouse South Diamond Street 

Store: Bell Phone 154—111. 182 
Greenhouse, Bell 775 



I 



We Pipe Your House for 
QAS 

OR WIRE IT FOR 

ELECTRICITY 

AT COST 

Jacksonville Ry & Light Co. 

TWO YEARS TO PAY 224 S. MAIN 



WBBMTSSBSSBBK 



THAT OUR HOME-MADE CANDIES ARE MADE TO PLEASE 

YOU 

That you can get what you want like you want it here in the 

way of SUNDAES, SODAS, and ail kinds of HOT DRINKS 

JUST PHONE 70— WE DELIVER. 

ittulUitlx $ Dfamiltott 

216 East State Street 



LATEST STYLES IN 
FALL & WINTER MILLINERY 

Fisk Hats a Specialty 



Mrs. M. O'Neil 

206 East State Street 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Millinery 
Needlecraft, Corsets 



S. Side Square 



GIRLS— PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS. 



L. C. & R. E. HENRY 
DEALERS IN FINE MILLINERY 



Always Something New and 

Up-to-Date 

238 South Side Square 




Cuwts.$urra. 

jACKSONViLUS* AU 

Low Prices and Square Dealings 
Keep Us Busy 



Sr- = ^ 

FOR THOSE WHO DISCRIMINATE 

We simply suggest that it has taken our constant effort to please the 
students who come to our city. We select only the BEST materials and 
and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 

PURE CANDIES, HOT AND COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 
AND PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES. 

Telephone 227 ALL PACKAGES DELIVERED 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

227 WEST STATE STREET 


C.J.DEPPE&CO. 

Known for "Ready-toWear" and 
Popular Priced Dry Goods 


KUM-RITE-IN 
Let Us Show You the Most Complete 
Line of Silk Hosiery, Silk Gloves, 
American Lady Corsets, Kid Gloves, 
Fancy Neckwear, Laces, Ribbons 
and Trimmings. 


^ST~ DKY GOODS STOR E ^^ 




Attention! 

Miss B. — When one is attending closely, what is 
the usual position of the eyes ? 

C. W. — The eyes are generally fastened on the 
speaker. 


T TSaf est Place to Trade £1 

rllLLERBY'^ 

DRY GOODS STORE 

PHONES 309 


Hi If V SWEATERS 
LflVILU HOSIERY 

FRANK BYRNS, 

HAT STORE 

___ \ 



n — — — — -<\ 

VISIT 

Sch ram's 

JEWELRY STORE 

WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Also Good-looking and Good-wearing Goods. 
Will Be Pleased to Show Them. 


GO TO THE 

RUSSELL & LYON 

JEWELRY STORE 

FOR THE BEST REPAIRING OF 
ALL KINDS 


E.W.BASSETT 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 
DIE STATIONERY 
ENGRAVED CARDS 
SILVER AND GLASS 
ART POTTERY 
NOVELTIES 
No. 21 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 


Miss N. — Did you notice any sameness of color in 
the Mabinogeon story ? 

P. W. — Yes. All the men had red hair. 


BRADY BROS. 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 
House Furnishings and Paints 
45-47 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 


GAY'S 
RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 

- *) 



Cafe 



Confectionery 



peacock 3ntt 



Catering 



Soda 



Candies 



PIEPENBRING'S 

VARIETY STORE 
ONE BLOCK EAST OF COLLEGE 

CANDIES, CAKES, COOKIES, 

PIES, SANDWICHES, 

POP ON ICE, GROCERIES 

CALIFORNIA FRUITS 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



"The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispette Shop 



Pop-corn That Melts in Your 
Mouth 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

EAST STATE ST. 



A. E. — Think of it. I got two cinnamon rolls to- 



day. 



H. M. — How did you ever find storage room for 



two? 



A. E. — Oh, I had an empty period. 



And Annex for Ladies. 
221=223 EAST STATE STREET 

Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



Wedding 
Reception 
Banquets 
Lnnciieons 
^^^r^^^ Musicals 
r'O^ *• iln Theater Parties 
Ij^^^t^r^ Dinner Parties 
^^ Card Clubs 

Special attention to all College functions 

VICKERY'S 

Jacksonville, 111. 



J. P. BROWN 

MUSIC HOUSE 

Musical Talking 

Merckandise Machines 

Sneet Music 

19 S. Side Square, Jacksonville 



J acksonville s Foremost Store for 

Men 

And Specialties for Women 

Knitted Silk Coats 

Sweater Coats, Student Caps 

Manish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Hand Bags 



REAL ENJOYMENT 

The kind that lasts and is pleas- 
ant to recall — 
in one of our fine rigs, or help 
her arrange a Hay Ride Party. 
Phone us for Carriages for any 
occasion 

EITHER PHONE 850 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



Morning after Third Prep. Stunt 

M. F. — Did you hear that Miss H. will stuff mice 
if you bring them to her? 

W. B. — Well! Where would you get a mouse? 
M. F. — Search me ! 



loover 



&Sk 



reve 



I 



Have a Complete Line of Drugs, 
Kodaks, Perfumes 

Stationery and Holiday Gifts 

We Do Developing and Printing 

East & West Side Sq. 



We Welcome You as a Student 
after Knowledge 



Pleased to have you call on your 
down town trips 



Badger Drug Store 

235 E. State St. Illinois 57 



Everything for the Home 



Everything for the Home 



Andre Sc Andre 



Student Headquarters 
for Room Furnishings 



The Best Goods for the Price, No Matter What the Price. 




The 
Gift 
Store 



Andre ®> Andre 



The 
Gift 
Store 



DRUGS BOOKS 

City Drug and Book 

Store 

J. A. OBERMEYER & SON 

S. Side Square 

Give Us a Call 
Bell 457 III inois 572 

College Suplies Pennants 



ALDEN BROWN 

314 W. STATE ST. 

+ 
Pictures Artist 

Frames Materials 



HAIRDRESSER. 

Artistic hairdressing, Shampooing, Manicuring, Facial 
Massage. Treatment of the Hair and Scalp, my specialty. 

Will call by appointment. 
MRS. JOHN R. DUNN Residence 640 S. Prairie St. 

Illinois Phone 1194. 



All the faculty, students and friends 
of the College should have a checking 
or savings acount with 

F. G. Farrell & Co. 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell President 

E. E. Crab tree V. President 

H. H. Potter Cashier 

M. W. Osborne Ass't Cash. 



Pacific Hotel 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Jacksonville's Best Hotel 



70 ROOMS 



S. M. CAMPBELL, Manager 



COLLEGE GIRLS: 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters 
Ladies' Manito Hosiery. 

LUKEMAN BROS. 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



CJje &pers Jkttonal Jlanfe 

Established 1852 




LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
We have provided a Special Department for Ladies with a window 
for their exclusive use in transacting their business, also a Ladies' writ- 
ing room adjoinng, daintily furnished, which is at their disposal. 

OFFICERS 

M. F. Dunlap President 0. F. Buffe Cashier 

Andrew Russel V. President H. C. Clement Asst. Cashier 
Chas. B. Graff V. President W. G. Goebel Asst. Cashier 
H. J. Rodgers V. President H. K. Chenowith Ast. Cashier 
Arthur Vannier Ast. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
Owen P. Thompson George Dietrick 



E. F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 
Andrew Russel 



H. M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
M. F. Dunlap 



m< 




msjq&k 



COLLEGEJWTWEAR 

Large assortment of Foot- 
wear for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-Room 
Footwear. 

HOPPERS 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



MATH1S, KAMM & SHIBE 

SAY 

This is just to remind you that 
we can suply any and all of 
your FOOTWEAR needs. 



CITY STEAM 

Cleaning and Dyeing Works 

208 E. State 

E. A. SCHOEDSACEK, Proprietor 



Party Dresses, Kid Gloves 

Shippers a Specialty 



Miss Steward — "Now girls, let's have no more of 
this quibbling. Who was Rameses II? Answer 'yes' 



or *no. 



STYLE + QUALITY + FINE SHOE MAKING 



THE GYPSY BOOT 
WILL BE THE 
LEADING STYLE 
THIS FALL 




WE HAVE THEM 

IN 

BRONZE KID 

BLUE KID 

NAT KID 



•>SH0E.C0.< 



Complete Line of Evening Slippers 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO. 



Society Programs and Menus 
THE ROACH PRESS 

ILLINOIS PHONE 236 OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 

Our Customers Say: "The Service is a little better." 



LENG. MAGILL 

FOR PRINTING 

PROGRAMS, INVITATIONS 
PERSONAL CARDS, ETC. 

No. 227 EAST STATE STREET 
Illinois Phone 418 

Our Motto: "Not how cheap, but how 
good." 



JOB PRINTING OF ALL KINDS 

JOHN K. LONG 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 
Programs and Stationery 



213 WEST MORGAN STREET 
ILLINOIS PHONE 400 



From an English I theme — Lindsay is not married. 
He entertained himself by writing. 



Blje <Brap\)ic T2VrU 
(Tottcern 



PRINTERS 
PUBLISHERS 
STATIONERS 
Engraved Cards 
Artistic Programs 
for Special Occasions 



I.M.BUNCE&CO 



PRINTING 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Plain China for Decorating 



Dr. ALBYN LINCOLN ADAMS 

OCULIST AND AURIST 

To the State School for the Blind 

323 WEST STATE STREET 



Practice Limited to Diseases of the 
EYE, EAR, NOSE & THROAT 
Both Telephones 



GEORGE STACY, M. D. 

(Northwestern University) 
S. E. Cor. Square (over Hoppers') 



Sees patients by appointment, at of- 
fice and elsewhere. Office hours: 11 to 
1; 2 to 4. Telephones: Bell 435, 111. 
1335 and (home) 1334. 



ALPHA B. APPLEBEE 

DENTIST 

326 WEST STATE STREET 



Dr. AUSTIN C. KINQSLEY 

DENTIST 

409 AYERS BANK BUILDING 

Both Phones 760 



GIRLS— PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS. 



S.S.KRESGECO. 

5 and 10c STORE 



A POPULAR PLACE for COLLEGE 
GIRLS 



Jhe&nootum 



212-214 E. State St 



Cloaks, Suits, Furs 
and Millinery 

At Prices Tkat Are Rigkt 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1900 



LLINOI^ WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 
A Standard College 

Regular college and academy courses leading to 
Bachelor's degree. Pre-eminently a Christian 
college with every facility for thorough work. 
Located in the Middle West, in a beautiful, dig- 
nified, old college town, noted for its literary 
and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are 
looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

Jacksonville, Illinois 




I 



3 0112 1058 !J'™WI 






The Roach Press, Jacksonville